The Camera, Colonialism and Social Networks

Studies in Photography, in collaboration with the National Trust for Scotland, are publishing the proceedings of The Morton Photography symposium The Camera, Colonialism and Social Networks, that was held at Broughton House in April 2019.

Two dancing girls, possibly E A Hornel, c1890–c1920, NTS, Broughton House

This symposium was anchored in the photographic collection of artist E. A. Hornel, kept at Broughton House & Garden, whose photography of Japan and Sri Lanka at the turn of the twentieth century was used so evidently as part of his own artworks (a topic of research also funded by the Morton Charitable Trust). It offered a rare opportunity to present research on a variety of inter-related subjects: the history of photography and the development of photography in Asia, Western photographers in the age of colonialism, and the personal connections and networks which underpinned both social interaction and the exchange of knowledge in artistic and photographic circles.

Dr Samuel Gallacher, National Trust for Scotland, Dumfries & Galloway

The conference brought together leading scholars in the fields of photography and colonialism, offering us new insights and connections between these two complex studies.

This beautiful illustrated special publication from Studies in Photography features essays given at the symposium from Ben Reiss, the Morton Photography Project Curator at National Trust for Scotland; Dr Maria Golovteeva, Researcher at Christie’s Auction House; Sarah Hepworth, Senior Librarian at The University of Glasgow Library: Archive and Special Collections; Professor Nick Pearce, Richmond Chair of Fine Arts at University of Glasgow; Julie Gibb, Assistant Curator at National Museums Scotland; Rachel Nordstrom, Photographic Collections Manager at University of St Andrews, Special Collections; Jessica Lee, BA Glasgow School of Art and Alice Strang, Senior Curator at National Galleries of Scotland.

Two Japanese Girls, E A Hornel, c1921–25, oil on canvas, NTS, Broughton House

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